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10 Best Angular UI Libraries

10 Best Angular UI Libraries

by
November 9, 2021

Angular has established itself as one of the most popular JavaScript frameworks. Its component-based architecture enables the developer to split the application into small reusable chunks. You can create your own user interface components, but a much more efficient way to build your application would be to use a UI library.

From my experience working in a bespoke software development company, I have gathered experience with various Angular UI libraries and I have made a list that you may find useful in one of your projects.

1. Angular Material

Angular Material is one of the most used Angular UI libraries to this day. It is based on Google’s Material Design, and it is maintained by a Google team alongside public community contributions. It has a comprehensive set of UI components and it is regularly updated to work with the latest version of Angular. It also has up to date documentation with examples on how to use it. It provides the basic toolkit for any website and is a great starting point for any project.

Pros: 

  • Free to use
  • Excellent documentation
  • Lots of questions are answered in StackOverflow and other sites.
  • Maintained by a Google team 
  • It is released immediately with a new Angular version and is upgradable by the ng cli.
  • Has quite a lot of features
  • Has a great theme support for consistency

Cons:

  • Components are generic and often need to be additionally customized
  • Doesn’t have charts
  • Usable only with Angular 

2. DevExtreme

DevExtreme is a UI components library that supports multiple frameworks, including Angular, React and Vue. It comes with a large number of high-performance and responsive UI components. In addition, it has data grids, interactive charts, editors and more. It also has integrated support for .NET OData store and is a great tool to use if your project relies on it. This library, however, is only free to use for non-commercial purposes, and it requires a developer license for commercial projects.

Pros: 

  • Developed for multiple frameworks
  • Developed by a commercial team
  • Has good documentation
  • Has many complex features, including charts

Cons:

  • Paid for commercial applications
  • Has less information about issues outside of the official documentation

3.Ng Bootstrap

Ng Bootstrap is a variant of the Bootstrap UI library configured to work for Angular. It actually uses the Bootstrap library underneath and provides everything you loved about Bootstrap 4. It supports Angular 4+. With Angular 12+, it now also supports Bootstrap 5. 

Pros:

  • Free to use
  • Adds Bootstrap support.

Cons: 

  • Does not support earlier versions of Angular before Angular 4+ 
  • No Bootstrap 3 support

4. Clarity

Clarity is an open-source library created by VMWare. Its design is based on continuous research. It includes core components that can be used regardless of the framework, but it also includes Angular components. It has extensive documentation, and it is frequently updated with the latest version of Angular .

Pros:

  • Free to use
  • Good support

Cons:

  • Barebones documentation

5. Ngx Bootstrap

This is another Bootstrap library implementation that removes the jQuery dependency for Angular. It supports Bootstrap 3 through 5 for its different iterations and might be the only choice for a project that really needs to use Bootstrap 3. It is maintained by Valor Software, and might be a good tool to use, especially for people using some of their other libraries like Ng2-charts.

Pros:

  • Free to use
  • Adds Bootstrap support
  • Supports Bootstrap 3

Cons:

  • Limited use

6. MDB MDBootstrap

MDB is a library based on Bootstrap and inspired by Material Design. The current version is MDB 5 and it supports React, Vue and Angular. It has all the features that you love about Bootstrap, but follows the material design guidelines.

Pros: 

  • Has a great feature set
  • Excellent documentation

Cons:

  • Somewhat hard to customize
  • The good stuff is paid, and even in different tiers

7. Kendo UI

Kendo UI is a UI library that supports JQuery, Angular, React and Vue. It is developed by  Progress. It has more than 100 UI components that can be easily customized. It has a default theme, as well as Material and Bootstrap themes. It is also possible to make your own custom theme. However, the library is not free, but you can request a free 30-day trial.

Pros:

  • Developed for multiple frameworks
  • Has good documentation and support
  • Has many complex features, including charts
  • Bootstrap and Material themes

Cons: 

  • Paid with a limited trial time

8. Onsen UI

Onsen UI is an open-source library that has a rich set of UI components for mobile apps. It is also perfect for developing hybrid apps and progressive web apps. It supports both AngularJS and Angular.

Pros:

  • Good mobile components support
  • Open-source
  • It can be used with different frameworks

Cons:

  • Limited documentation
  • Limited adoption

9. Prime NG

PrimeNG is an open-source UI components library developed by PrimeTek Informatics. Most of the components are native, but there are some dependencies (Quill Editor, Google Maps). One of its key features is that it enriches mobile user experience with touch optimised design elements.

Pros:

  • Excellent documentation, including tutorial videos
  • Open-source
  • A good amount of (paid) prebuilt templates
  • A lot of theme customizations

Cons:

  • Some components have third party dependencies

10. Teradata Covalent UI Platform

Teradata Covalent UI Platform focuses on solving the developers’ needs. It follows the Material Design specifications and uses Angular Material. Furthermore, the platform follows the atomic design principles and unites smaller components into bigger ones. Some of its interesting features include user profile, breadcrumbs, file upload and a dynamic menu.

Pros:

  • Good documentation with examples
  • Rich component catalogue including charts and animations
  • Free to use

Cons:

  • Limited adoption

All in all, the main purpose of UI libraries is to help us build applications faster. Although some Angular libraries are more popular than others, it is sometimes not possible to distinguish one from the others. However, it is always good to be familiar with the new trends and designs. Last but not least, as a general rule, there is no “best library” but rather a library that fits your project needs the most and becomes your best choice for your application.

Stiliana Georgieva

Junior Software Engineer at Dreamix

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